• Stockholm-based artists Klara Källström and Thobias Fäldt founded B-B-B-Books in 2011 with designers 1:2:3, Axel Von Friesen and Petter Törnqvist. Since then they have self-published ten books with “a focus on photography”. One of the books, Wikiland, was produced in two editions in 2011 and 2014 and in an evolving exhibition form since 2012. Miranda Gavin caught up with the artists to find out more about their working process, in particular the Wikiland project. MG: Why did you set up a publishing operation?KK: We decided to set up a publishing house because it was a way to create the kinds of publications we wanted without having to compromise. The works that we put into B-B-B-Books together form the context for the publishing. Their [...]

  • In the late 1970s the renowned photographer, Tod Papageorge, regularly visited and photographed the legendary New York discothèque, Studio 54. By turning his attention away from its infamous celebrity culture and instead towards his own photographic instincts, Papageorge captured the club’s vibrancy, decadence, energy and glamour like no one else, both documenting the scene as it was and at the same time investing it with a poetic poignancy that continues to resonate today. Thirty-five years later, the work has finally been released – most recently in book form – as Studio 54 (published by STANLEY/BARKER), which was widely acknowledged as one of the best photobooks of 2014. TP: Tod PapageorgeAS: Aaron SchumanAS: What first drew you to Studio 54? TP: The most common questions that [...]

  •       From 2012-2014, Alec Soth regularly assumed the disappearing role of the newspaper reporter whilst collaborating with writers, and travelling throughout the United States in search of stories for his self-published newspaper, The LBM Dispatch, as well as on assignment for The New York Times and other publications. In his latest monograph, Songbook, he collects together many of the resulting photographs, but strips them of their accompanying texts and specific contexts, presenting a broader and more lyrical portrait of the fragmentary nature of human interaction and community in the digital age, and of an America that fetishises independence yet still desperately longs to be united. ASc – Aaron SchumanASo – Alec SothASc: Firstly, so many of the images in Songbook were initially made whilst you were [...]

  • Japanese artist Fumiko Imano (b. 1974) studied Fine Art and then Fashion Styling and Photography in London in the late 90s. French fashion designer Charles Anastase was one of the first to recognise her work, commissioning her to shoot his campaigns and sparking a working relationship that continues to this day. Whilst Imano’s fashion work has a vivacity and lightness that are just the right qualities for its commercial imperative, her personal work demonstrates an approach that is spontaneous and yet highly nuanced. Imano makes self portraits where she appears at turns coquettish, vulnerable, upbeat and melancholy. The set-up is often domestic and staged economically – she might be sitting at a kitchen table concealing her face behind a huge melon, addressing the camera from behind her desk or just [...]
  • Deciding which photography bookshops to visit on a trip to Tokyo is not easy – there are so many good ones. Japan has been at the forefront of photo book publishing for decades – and Japanese photographers have often worked with books, rather than exhibitions in mind. In addition, retail is something the Japanese do extremely well. All transactions, from the prosaic to the extravagant, are conducted with a sense of decorum and an attention to detail.  But I think SO Books, (introduced to me by Tomoki Matsumoto of T&M Projects) might be one of the best. The shop is long and narrow, with a small desk at the back. It’s well-lit, beautifully organised, quiet and full of books, from floor to ceiling. When I met the owner, Ikuo Ogasawara, he [...]
  • All this week, in the run up to Room&Book which opens tonight at the ICA, its founder Lucy Moore takes us through some of its publications, events and more. The photographs in Ciarán Óg Arnold's new book have drawn comparisons with those of Graham Smith: both photographers have documented the harsh realities of life in their hometowns during periods of economic downturn. In Smith’s case, it was Middlesborough in the 70s and 80s; Arnold’s new book is a photo-diary documenting the lives of men and women in the Irish town of Ballinasloe in Galway, which has steadily declined since the recession hit Ireland almost a decade ago.The images in I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed. but all is I could do was to get drunk again, [...]