• In a manifesto entitled The Future of Pictorial Photography, published in 1916, Alvin Langdon Coburn asked the following: “. . .why should not the camera throw off the shackles of conventional representation and attempt something fresh and untried? Why, I ask you earnestly, need we go on making commonplace little exposures of subjects that may be sorted into groups of landscapes, portraits, and figure studies? Think of the joy of doing something which it would be impossible to classify, or to tell which was the top and which the bottom!” Coburn’s entreaties had developed as a response to the mass uptake of photography that had occurred between the final decade of the nineteenth century and the first decade of the twentieth, thanks to advances in technology; cameras such as Kodak’s Box [...]

  • They meet at a book launch. She is a junior editor at an established publishing house; he is a general surgeon in a university hospital. The event marks the publication of a colleague’s memoir. She has nothing to do with the project; he loathes the author. He is happy to accommodate her other lovers, of whom she keeps a consistent number. She is happy to work around his wife, of whom she assumes there is a normal number, and whose existence she infers from the obvious. The first time he arrives at her door he brings a bottle of wine, acquired in haste from the local store. She indicates she has no need for such a gesture. He never repeats it. After a month he lingers at the door a fraction [...]

  • It’s a specific moment when you leave the house with a new partner for the first time. When you consolidate as a couple and the references present in each other becomes a context instead of an identity. There is a pool of exposure, a dilution of intimacy, a pride and an intention. One is usually ahead of the other, more proud but both willing. That is, if this is a love story. Or an in-love story.  From what I can gather, all collections are love stories, or death stories. Though perhaps love is rarely explicitly stated, it is inherent in the handling and nurturing of these constructed sets of interrelated objects.  The relationships between the collector and the collected go beyond the physical qualities of the objects and move into a [...]

  • HOTSHOE:  To begin with, how did you make the photographs?Anthony Carr: In terms of technique, I mostly use homemade pinhole cameras and film. The cameras are fashioned from old 35mm film canisters so they are nice and discreet which means I can leave them all over the place for long periods, knowing most of them won’t be discovered. It also means I’m able to install them in some strange nooks and crannies. This helps me to get some interesting viewpoints and also explains the strange perspective in some of the photographs due to the curved film plane of the canisters. The other essential element in the majority of my work is an elongated or extended exposure time. These particular photographs were created over 4 days which allows us to witness [...]
  • Joe Faulkner recently spoke to photographer Laurent Kronental about his images of the powerful and ghostly landscapes of the Grands Ensembles in Paris. JF: How did you become interested in photography?LK: My passion for the image goes back to my childhood, but I only started photography at the age of 22, while traveling for six months in China. I was then living in Beijing and was using a small compact digital camera to capture my Asian experience. Fascinated by large cities, I was very excited to be part of one of them and be able to visit the country that had intrigued me for so long. From mega-cities to rural areas, everything in this country is overwhelming. Hong Kong was determinant. I was literally absorbed by its atmosphere: the palpable tension [...]
  • Photofusion and Rockarchive have collaborated to create this timeline of portraits of David Bowie, Silhouettes and Shadows. From an innocent boy playing in front of a small crowd to the Starman we all know. Joe Faulkner spoke to the founder of Rockarchive, Jill Furmanovsky, who is a prolific rock photographer in her own right.Joe Faulkner: How did you find yourself with the opportunity to photograph these people?Jill Furmanovsky: I presume you mean the rock and roll musicians?! As a student in the early 1970s I worked at The Rainbow Theatre in London taking live shots directly for the theatre. There I photographed concerts by the likes of The Who, Pink Floyd, Van Morrison, The Faces etc and could also photograph some rehearsals, which meant I met a few of the [...]